Portland

Maine Democrats choose Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton

Maine Democrats choose Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton

An unprecedented number of Democrats participated in the Maine presidential caucuses on Sunday, and chose Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders over former first lady and secretary of state Hillary Clinton.

Party officials said in a statement that a record high of more than 46,000 people gathered at hundreds of locations across the state to take part in the caucuses. They chose Sanders by a 2-1 margin over Clinton.

The voter turnout was overwhelming, particularly in Portland. At Deering High School, the queue of voters stretched around the athletic field.

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Portland mayoral candidates criticize state environmental regulators

Portland mayoral candidates criticize state environmental regulators

Soaring concerns over Portland’s toxic air on Thursday prompted the city’s top mayoral candidates to severely criticize state watchdogs for failing to implement effective measures to control air pollution.

Blasting at state regulators, Oregon Treasurer Ted Wheeler said they let people down by lack of transparency over pollution test results. He alleged that the state regulators’ controls were not sufficient but he wanted to give officials some time to act, otherwise he would have pushed for local control.

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Fiction writer imagines post-apocalyptic Portland after 9.0 magnitude earthquake

Fiction writer imagines post-apocalyptic Portland after 9.0 magnitude earthquake

A newly published five-part series of a reported science fiction imagines a post-apocalyptic Portland after a heavily devastating 9.0 magnitude earthquake strikes off the coast of Newport.

The fictional story titled “After the Big One” has been written by Portland resident Adam Rothstein who imagines what could happen in Portland after a powerful quake hits the city.

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AG Loretta Lynch visits Portland middle school

AG Loretta Lynch visits Portland middle school

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch visited George Middle School in Portland to participate in the GREAT Program Thursday morning. The program, which has been in the city since the 1990s, attracts as many as 2,000 elementary and middle school students every year.

The program, led by law enforcement, teaches students life skills as well as the importance of ensuring a distance from crimes and gangs. It also aims at building relationships between police, students and other people in the community.

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Trump says Romney would have dropped to his knees for endorsement in 2012

Trump says Romney would have dropped to his knees for endorsement in 2012

Responding to Mitt Romney’s recent harsh comments, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump sneered at him, saying the party’s 2012 nominee would have “dropped to his knees” for getting endorsed four years ago.

Rallying with Maine Gov. Paul LePage, who endorsed Trump last week, the billionaire business tycoon denounced Romney as a “choke artist” in the ballroom at the Westin Portland Harborview hotel on Thursday, just a few days before the state’s Republican caucuses.

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Maine marijuana legalization attempt fails

Maine marijuana legalization attempt fails

Marijuana legalization activists’ attempt to ask Maine voters in a Nov. 2016 referendum whether they want to legalize the recreational drug or not has collapsed, Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap’s office announced on Wednesday.

The measure required at least 61,123 valid signatures to be placed on the Nov. ballot. Petitioners for An Act to Legalize Marijuana submitted a total of 99,229 signatures, but the secretary of state’s office could validate just 51,543 of those signatures. Dunlap said that his office found nearly 48,000 invalid signatures.

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Water dispute will cost Portland $11,000 a year in lost revenue

Water dispute will cost Portland $11,000 a year in lost revenue

The Portland Water Bureau’s two-year-long legal fight with two of its wholesale customers over a funding formula will ultimately cost the city more than $11,000 a year in lost revenue.

The dispute started in 2013, after the Bureau made some changes in terms of its agreement to sell some of its water to the city of Tualatin and the Tualatin Valley Water District.

City authorities say the dispute was tied not to water guaranteed under agreement but instead for interruptible water - a special kind of water that carries a complex formula for peak water usage during summers.

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