Environment

Plants can make risky decisions as sophisticated as those made by humans

Plants can make risky decisions as sophisticated as those made by humans

Plants can’t just remember when you touch them instead they can also make risky decisions as sophisticated as the ones made by humans, all in the absence of brains or complex nervous systems. They could even judge risks more capably than we do.

All this has been found by a study that appeared in Current Biology on Thursday. Researchers demonstrated that when plants came across making a choice between a pot having constant levels of nutrients or another with unpredictable levels, a plant will go for the mystery pot if the conditions are sufficiently poor.

Great white shark tagged with camera to unveil mysterious winter behavior

Great white shark tagged with camera to unveil mysterious winter behavior

No one knows what great white sharks do in deep, deserted part of the Pacific Ocean during winters. To find out the same, some researchers tagged sharks with camera that can record a 10 hour long video.

The great white sharks often found roaming and feeding along the coastline from Central to Baja California go into great depth, about 3000–5000 meters deep into the Pacific Ocean. It takes them 30 to 40 days to reach a point approximately halfway between Mexico and Hawaii. They stay at this point from about April to July. This is an area smaller than Panama.

Study: Plants may just be smarter than you think

Study: Plants may just be smarter than you think

As per a latest study by an international team of researchers, appeared in Current Biology this week, plants could be smarter than earlier thought. The researchers analyzed decisions taken by plants when they were present in environments with distinct nutrient levels.

They found that plants demonstrated a remarkable ability to take calculated risks to secure the maximum amount of nutrients.

In a press released, Oxford University’s Alex Kacelnik said that it was the first ever demonstration of an adaptive response to risk in an organism that doesn’t have a nervous system.

Alaska Volcano Observatory notes increased seismic activity at Pavlof Volcano

Alaska Volcano Observatory notes increased seismic activity at Pavlof Volcano

Last week, the Alaska Volcano Observatory observed increased seismic activity and steam emissions from Pavlof Volcano. The movement has raised the volcano's alert level. Located on the southwestern end of the Alaska Peninsula, the volcano is among the most active in Alaska, with over 40 recorded eruptions, as per the observatory.

Most recently, the volcano erupted in May. In March, an eruption sent ash plumes nearly 40,000 feet over sea level.

Adélie colonies could decline by as much as 60% by end of the century: Study

Adélie colonies could decline by as much as 60% by end of the century: Study

Fluctuating climates have affected Adélie penguins, which breed on ice-free, rocky ground, for millions of years. Because of colder climates and extending glaciers, penguins had to ditch ice-covered breeding habitats.

Hot climates and melting glaciers mean more breeding territory for such penguins, which are one of the only two true Antarctic penguin species. Other one is the Emperor penguins.

Hawaii County opens lava viewing sight for tourists as it flows from Kilauea's Puu Oo

Hawaii County opens lava viewing sight for tourists as it flows from Kilauea's Puu Oo

It is the first time in three years that Hawaii County is opening a daily viewing area in Kalapana from 3 pm to 9 pm starting Thursday for visitors coming to see lava flow coming from Kilauea's Puu Oo. There is also a parking area set up along Highway 130 to accommodate the increased traffic.

According to Jeff Sutton, a scientist at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the lava advanced about 1,500 feet Wednesday as it approached bottom of a cliff. It is expected that flow will slow up once it hits the bottom of the cliff, from where the distance to the ocean 2 miles.

What’s making Amazon rainforest more flammable? Study says ‘Humans’

What’s making Amazon rainforest more flammable? Study says ‘Humans’

Researchers have blamed human disturbances for increased Amazon fires. In a two-year study, they said the Amazon rainforest are becoming more flammable due to increased human activities in forests. Their study stated that humans have even degraded the protected forest.

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